top of page

Part 3 Journey - Case Study

Architecture is an art that requires skill, creativity, and vision. It's a field that has evolved over time, and in the UK, it's evident in the various architectural styles across the country. In this blog post, we will be exploring the case study requirements for UK architecture Part 3.


Part 3 of the architectural training in the UK is the final stage of the professional qualification process. It involves a comprehensive assessment of the individual's knowledge, skills, and experience in architecture. The Part 3 examination is designed to test the candidate's ability to apply their knowledge in practical situations, including the design and construction process.






Case study requirements for UK architecture Part 3


The Part 3 examination includes a case study, which requires the candidate to demonstrate their ability to manage a construction project from inception to completion. The case study provides an opportunity for the candidate to showcase their knowledge, skills, and experience in architecture, construction, and project management.


The case study for Part 3 requires the candidate to select a construction project that they have worked on or have been involved in. The project must meet specific requirements, including:


1. A complex building project: The project must be a complex building project that involves a range of technical, design, and construction issues.


2. A project with a budget of at least £500,000: The project must have a budget of at least £500,000, which includes the cost of design, construction, and any associated fees.


3. A project completed within the last five years: The project must have been completed within the last five years, and the candidate must have been involved in the project at a senior level.


4. A project that demonstrates the candidate's ability to manage a construction project: The project must demonstrate the candidate's ability to manage a construction project from inception to completion, including design, procurement, construction, and project management.



Once the candidate has selected the project, they must provide a detailed report that includes the following information:


1. Project overview: A brief overview of the project, including the location, size, and scope of the project.


2. Project team: A list of the project team, including architects, engineers, contractors, and any other professionals involved in the project.


3. Design: A description of the design process, including any challenges that were faced, and how they were overcome.


4. Procurement: A description of the procurement process, including the selection of contractors and suppliers.


5. Construction: A description of the construction process, including any challenges that were faced, and how they were overcome.


6. Project management: A description of the project management process, including how the project was managed from inception to completion.


7. Lessons learned: A reflection on the project, including any lessons learned, and how they would approach similar projects in the future.

Comments


bottom of page